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This area is now covered by housing from Fitzroy Street and the Brownstown Estates. For a time these POWs were guarded by Welsh servicemen who had been transferred from Germany (known as "Bluecaps") and who were billeted at St Patrick's Hall in Thomas Street.

Many of the Welsh soldiers chose to be demobilised to Portadown as they had formed relationships there.

A large prisoner-of-war (POW) camp was built at Portadown during World War II.

It was at the site of a former sports facility on what was then the western edge of town.

In the 19th and 20th centuries Portadown was also a major centre for the production of textiles (mainly linen).

Of its population, about 61% are from a Protestant background and 31% from a Catholic background.

In one of the worst atrocities of the rebellion, in November 1641, Irish rebels forced about 100 captured English and Scottish settlers (or 'planters') off the Bann bridge and they either drowned or were shot.

This became known as the "Portadown massacre", and partly precipitated the revenge attacks carried out in Ireland several years later by the forces of Oliver Cromwell.

The Ballybay River flows into the town from the west before joining the River Bann.

It is in the Armagh, Banbridge and Craigavon Borough Council area and had a population of about 22,000 at the 2011 Census.

For some purposes, Portadown is treated as part of the "Craigavon Urban Area", alongside Craigavon and Lurgan.

Although Portadown can trace its origins to the early 17th century Plantation of Ulster, it was not until the Victorian era and the arrival of the railway that it became a major town.

It earned the nickname "hub of the North" due to it being a major railway junction; where the Great Northern Railway's line diverged for Belfast, Dublin, Armagh and Derry.

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